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AWS re:Invent 2021: what you need to know

Written by Amazon Staff
Live Updates
November 29, 2021
Written by Amazon Staff
Image from AWS re:Invent conference in Las Vegas, Nevada
Photo by Colin Young-Wolff

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AWS re:Invent 2021: what you need to know

Amazon Web Services welcomes the global cloud computing community back to Las Vegas this week for the 10th edition of AWS re:Invent, and we’ll be keeping you updated on all the action.

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Celebrating our 10th re:Invent

As the 10th edition of re:Invent gets started here in Las Vegas, we take a look back at some of the event’s most memorable moments:

10 years of AWS re:Invent

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Robots take center stage in first news out of re:Invent

It was all about robotics last night with the first two announcements to come out of the AWS re:Invent news blocks:

A robot built by Boston Dynamics. The robot is on 4 legs and is yellow and black
Boston Dynamics' Spot Robot can be deployed in industrial environments to complete tasks that are dangerous or tedious for humans.

  • AWS IoT RoboRunner is a new robotics service that makes it easier for companies to build and deploy applications that help fleets of robots work seamlessly together. Building on the same technology used in Amazon fulfillment centers, it’s now being made available to all developers to build advanced robotics applications for their businesses.
  • The new AWS Robotics Startup Accelerator—which Amazon CTO Werner Vogels announced via his blog—is open to robotics hardware and software startups from around the globe. The accelerator, which AWS is running with MassRobotics, a leader in launching innovative robotics programs, offers a range of benefits including hands-on training with AWS robotics solutions, and up to $10,000 in promotional credits to use AWS IoT, Robotics, and machine learning services.

    Startups accepted into the four-week program will be able to consult with AWS and MassRobotics industry experts on business models, as well as AWS robotics experts for help overcoming technological blockers. They will also gain additional knowledge through mentoring from robotics domain experts and technical subject matter experts. To prepare for life after the accelerator, they will get business development and investment guidance from MassRobotics, and co-marketing opportunities with AWS via blogs and case studies.

Find out more about AWS IoT RoboRunner. Learn more about the AWS Robotics Startup Accelerator and how to apply.

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How to build an impactful corporate citizenship strategy

A headshot of AWS head of global inclusion, diversity and equity LaDavia Drane, in black and white, with a colorful background

According to a study by Deloitte, corporate citizenship is now a CEO-level concern—defining an organization’s very identity. AWS Head of Global Inclusion, Diversity, and Equity LaDavia Drane hosted a panel discussion this morning to examine why corporate citizenship is such a business imperative and what the fundamentals are of building a successful strategy. Drane was joined by Gina Fratarcangeli, managing director at Accenture; Noelle Abra, associate director at Biogen; Lauren Shanley, chief of staff at Pega Systems; and Greg Gill, president and CEO at SRO Motorsports, to discuss everything from integrating social responsibility with corporate citizenship, to how employee engagement and empathy from leaders build social responsibility culture organically inside organizations. The session ended with inspiring ways for companies to think about how to use data to make commitments to inclusion, diversity and equity even bigger—both in the workplace and in the community.

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More than 10 new offerings for AWS Partners

Yesterday’s AWS Global Partner Summit keynote included more than 10 news announcements on our offerings for AWS Partners—companies that use Amazon Web Services to build solutions and services for other businesses and organizations. Two highlights:

  • New AWS Game Day Partner benefits to help build cloud skills. AWS GameDays are team exercises that allow customers and partners to solve real-world problems using AWS solutions in a virtual, gamified, and risk-free environment. Companies in the AWS Partner Differentiation Program will now have more opportunities for their employees to access these hands-on sessions to explore AWS and help them upskill.
  • A new AWS Energy Competency Program to support the global energy industry in safely meeting increasing demand, while accelerating the transition to a more sustainable future. The program will help connect energy producers with highly specialized AWS Partners to help them build and operate assets efficiently and safely, while furthering the development of sustainable energy solutions. Learn more.
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Working backwards to make digital health care more equitable

The use of telemedicine dramatically increased during the pandemic, but many patients who did not have smartphones or broadband internet were limited in their ability to access virtual care. This is one of the challenges the new AWS Cloud Innovation Center (CIC) at the University of California (UC) Davis Health—announced at re:Invent yesterday—will explore. The center is the latest in AWS’s global CIC Program, an initiative that brings together nonprofit, education, and government organizations to collaborate on solutions to address real-world problems using Amazon’s ‘working backwards’ approach to innovation.

Image of the AWS Cloud Innovation Center (CIC) at the University of California (UC) Davis Health
Architectural render of the AWS Cloud Innovation Center (CIC) at the University of California (UC) Davis Health.

The UC Davis Health CIC is the first at an academic medical center and will allow clinicians or clinical care providers, patients, and developers to exchange ideas, as well as prototype and validate open-source solutions. It will focus on digital health equity, looking at discrepancies in how technology is currently used in healthcare, transportation, and mental health, and what could be improved to serve a greater diversity of patients. Clinicians, patients, and the community-at-large will be invited to submit their ideas for projects for the CIC to work on.

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Invest in employees’ skills? You can’t afford not to

Image of the AWS Cloud Innovation Center (CIC) at the University of California (UC) Davis Health

“If you have an interest in cloud, we can train you”—this was the message from AWS Vice President of Training and Certification Maureen Lonergan in her leadership session yesterday, as she talked about how AWS is delivering on its commitment to train 29 million people in cloud computing skills globally by 2025. Lonergan also discussed how AWS is helping organizations build cloud fluency across their workforce. One example came from guest speaker Kathy Kay, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer of 140-year-old global financial services company Principal Financial Group, who described how the company is working with the AWS to transform the way it trains its employees and creates a culture of continuous learning. “Migrating to the cloud requires critical, in-demand skills that weren’t readily available in our teams, or simple to hire,” said Kay. “To move quickly, our best option was to upskill our existing staff while continuing to recruit talent.” Using AWS Training and Certification, Principal has significantly advanced its employees’ cloud capabilities and accelerated its speed of innovation in the cloud. For example, a group of Principal interns with little to no cloud experience entered an AWS hackathon and successfully migrated on-premises data to a cloud data warehouse in only nine weeks, a task that would usually take an experienced team six months to complete.

According to Lonergan, employees “choose to stay at companies where they build skills and competencies. They want to do meaningful, interesting work.” With cloud skills becoming ever-more sought after across all industries, she cited a recent Enterprise Strategy Group study that found 75% of learners said they wanted more training on AWS services to be more effective on the job. “Investing in your employees this way might seem like a nice thing to do, especially if you’re worried about them potentially leaving,” she said. “I’m here to say you can’t afford not to.”

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20 nonprofits receive funding and support through AWS Imagine Grant

An illustration of a globe with multicolored circular graphics near it

Ensuring clean drinking water for millions of people. Accelerating research into Crohn’s Disease. Understanding sperm whale communication. Expanding access to classical music. Enabling more effective collaboration when responding to disasters. These are just some of the bold visions of the 20 nonprofit organizations that received an AWS Imagine Grant this year, announced during re:Invent. The program is a public grant opportunity open to registered 501(c) nonprofit organizations in the U.S. that are using technology to solve some of the world’s most pressing challenges. Since launching in 2018 it has awarded more than $4.5 million in unrestricted funds, AWS Promotional Credits, and AWS training support to 46 nonprofit organizations. This year, the program offered two new award categories—the Go Further, Faster award for highly innovative projects using advanced cloud services, and the Momentum to Modernize award for foundational technology projects— and expanded funding for nonprofits. As part of the program, AWS seeks proposals for big ideas on how to leverage technology in new and innovative ways to accelerate impact in local and global communities. Learn more about the AWS Imagine Grant.

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United Airlines’ pivot in the pandemic

Image from AWS re:Invent, showing illustrations of cloud computing themes

In April 2020, United Airlines found itself in the unusual position of flying fewer passengers in a day than it had pilots on staff, said Linda Jojo, United’s Executive Vice President of Technology and Chief Digital Officer, on the situation the company faced at the start of the pandemic. Jojo—who was speaking at re:Invent this morning during AWS CEO Adam Selipsky’s keynote—explained how the airline navigated the challenges of COVID-19 by embracing them as an opportunity to innovate faster in the cloud.

Pre-pandemic, United flew an average of 450,000 passengers per day. However as international travel almost ground to a halt, the airline’s technical team was initially forced to shutter most of its technology projects and focus on streamlining the company’s IT operations to reduce costs. Fortunately, United had already decided to modernize its technology on AWS, and now it had the chance to create tools for its customers to help them easily manage the new realities of travel. For example, United developed its Travel Ready Center on AWS to help passengers easily comply with testing and vaccine documentation requirements that vary from destination to destination. Today, it’s using AWS machine learning to automatically evaluate passengers’ uploaded documentation so that they can bypass congested airport lobbies and check in to their flights quickly through United’s mobile app. Learn more about how United Airlines is innovating with AWS.

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Cloud is the opportunity to reimagine everything

What do Angelo-Giuseppi ‘Hank’ Luisetti, an American college basketball player; Florence Nightingale, a British nurse, social reformer, and pioneer in statistics; and Roscoe Brown, one of the first Black aviators to serve in the U.S. Army Air Corps, all have in common? Whether it was Luisetti pioneering an early version of the jump shot in the 1930s, to Nightingale driving huge reforms in healthcare in the late 1800s, to Brown breaking racial stereotypes as a distinguished, trailblazing pilot in World War II, they were all considered innovators in their specific field. And according to AWS CEO Adam Selipsky, they were all pathfinders: people who refused to accept the status quo and looked for a better way to do things–transforming their fields and communities in the process.

Pathfinding was the theme of Selipsky’s keynote at re:Invent this morning, his first since taking over as CEO earlier this year. Selipsky said AWS had come a long way in 15 years, looking back at how it disrupted the information technology industry when it launched in 2006, when the concept of cloud hardly existed. He described how IT and infrastructure was inflexible and slow, and suffocated innovation. AWS knew there could be a better path forward, then—and now. And according to Selipsky, the company is running as hard and fast now as it was back in 2006.

During his keynote, Selipksy made a suite of new service announcements showcasing AWS’s continued commitment to innovation, as well as inviting customers Nasdaq, United Airlines, Dish Wireless, and 3M on stage to share how AWS is helping them forge entirely new paths in their own industries.

AWS CEO Adam Selipsky makes six major service announcements during keynote

AWS CEO Adam Selipsy stands on stage and addresses the crowd at AWS re:Invent conference, 2021
Adam Selipsky, CEO Amazon Web Services, on stage during his keynote at AWS re:Invent on Tuesday, November 30, 2021 at the Venetian Resort in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Photo by Colin Young-Wolff

New instances powered by AWS-designed chips lower costs and increase energy efficiency

In 2006—when cell phones could flip, but they weren’t yet smart—a team of AWS engineers set themselves an ambitious goal of making almost infinite computing power available to anyone in the world. And they did it. The service they created, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), revolutionised the way people build businesses by offering on-demand access to the kind of compute power previously only available to Fortune 500 companies. Fifteen years on, and EC2 shows no sign of slowing down. Today’s announcement of three new Amazon EC2 instances (virtual servers that mimic the functionality of physical servers) powered by three new AWS-designed chips—AWS Graviton 3, AWS Trainium, and AWS Nitro SSD—will help customers:

  • Significantly improve the performance, cost, and energy-efficiency of the workloads they run on EC2
  • Speed up the time it takes to train machine learning models at lower cost
  • Ensure optimum storage performance for data intensive workloads

As part of the announcement, Selipsky said: “AWS is working with SAP to power SAP HANA Cloud with AWS Graviton processors.” Read the press release to find out more.

Making it easier to move off a mainframe

For those of us not so well-versed in the language of information technology, a mainframe, or ‘big iron’ as they are sometimes referred to, is a high-performance computer typically used by large companies for critical applications—such as storing and processing large amounts of customer data. While mainframes have been used for decades in industries including banking and healthcare, they are complex, expensive, and difficult to scale. That’s not to mention the fact that applications written for mainframes are increasingly hard to manage, as fewer and fewer engineers specialise in what’s essentially an outdated technology. Many organizations want to modernize their systems and move from mainframes to the cloud, but are held back by the sheer complexity and time-consuming nature of the process. That’s why the new managed service AWS Mainframe Modernization, which makes it faster and easier to move mainframe workloads to the cloud, could be prove a big deal for enterprises that want to make the leap—and fast. Read the press release to find out more.

Setting up a private 5G network in just a few clicks

More and more companies need to collect, analyse, and transfer huge amounts of data from sensors and devices in their operations, and many want to use cellular technologies like 5G to help them do it. The advantages of 5G are that it allows organizations to connect more devices, and transfer data more cost-effectively and flexibly than current wired and wireless networking technologies. The problem? Building your own private 5G network generally requires considerable investment—in both hardware and software, and in time required to set it up. AWS Private 5G promises to change all that. It will enable companies to set up private 5G networks in their facilities in days instead of months. With a few clicks, customers can specify the geographic area they want to cover, along with the amount of traffic they expect the network to handle, and AWS will do the rest—delivering everything they need to operate the network, so they don’t need to buy, integrate, and maintain hardware and software from multiple vendors. Read the press release to find out more.

The right capacity for data analysis, right when you need it

Many AWS customers make data-driven decisions using a wide variety of the company’s purpose-built analytics services. Things just got easier for them with today’s launch of serverless versions of three popular AWS analytics services—Amazon RedShift, Amazon MSK, and Amazon EMR. Essentially what this means is that customers in industries ranging from pharma to gaming to financial services and beyond can analyse data at scale without worrying about having to set up and manage any underlying infrastructure to support it. The serverless options will automatically add or subtract resources instantly to provide just the right amount of analytics capacity, right when customers need it. Read the press release to find out more.

The digital twins that could transform industrial operations

A digital sketch to illustrate a new AWS product or service announcement

Imagine you’re in charge of a metals processing plant, with a blast furnace burning up to 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. If you could detect anomalies in that furnace before it fails, it would transform the way you run your operations, not least from a safety perspective. This kind of predictive maintenance is possible with the use of a ‘digital twin’—a 3D virtual representation of the factory (or any other physical system), pulling in data from the plant’s equipment sensors and combining it with real-time video of various machines in operation, plus the maintenance history of those machines. Digital twins are virtual representations of physical systems, regularly updated with data to generate immediate insights about the operational state of the environments they are designed to mimic. Many industrial companies have the vast troves of data about their facilities required to build digital twins, but creating and managing them is really hard, even for the most technically advanced organizations, so the majority are unable to use them. AWS IoT TwinMaker will make it faster and easier for companies to create digital twins of buildings, factories, industrial equipment, production lines, and any other physical system, helping them to do things like optimize operations, increase production output, and improve equipment performance, as well as reacting more quickly and accurately when issues occur. Read the press release to find out more.

Helping car manufacturers make better, safer vehicles

A digital sketch to illustrate a new AWS product or service announcement

Car makers got a lift in the form of AWS IoT FleetWise—a new service designed to make it easier and more cost effective to collect and transfer vehicle data to the cloud in near-real time. Why does this matter? Well, manufacturers have been collecting data from standard vehicle sensors for years to improve vehicle quality and safety, but as these sensors get more advanced, they also generate a lot more data. Today’s sensors can produce up to two terabytes of data an hour per vehicle (roughly equivalent to 1,000 hours’ worth of movies) making the cost of transferring it to the cloud hugely expensive. AWS IoT FleetWise will allow manufacturers to collect and organize data from vehicles, regardless of make or model, and standardize it for analysis in the cloud. Among other things, this will help them to diagnose issues in individual vehicles, analyse vehicle fleet health to help prevent potential recalls or safety issues, and use analytics and machine learning to improve advanced technologies such as autonomous driving. Read the press release to find out more.

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From space to small business to skills

Screen capture of Max Peterson and David Tan at AWS ReInvent
Max Peterson, AWS Vice President, Worldwide Public Sector, and David Tan, Executive Director at Singapore Office for Space Technology & Industry.

Governments, education providers, nonprofits, aerospace, satellite, and healthcare organizations are all examples of AWS customers in the public sector. All of them, wherever they are in the world, are trying to accomplish complex missions with limited resources. And yet, as Max Peterson, AWS Vice President, Worldwide Public Sector, said in his leadership session yesterday, people expect the same world-class technology from these organizations as they do when they log onto Netflix or shop online.

Peterson’s session showcased the variety of ways AWS public sector customers change the way society engages, educates, and does business by delivering innovative, world-class services, enabled by the cloud.  Key announcements included:

  • A new agreement with Singapore’s Office for Space Technology & Industry—the first of its kind for AWS in Asia—to support Singapore’s focus on space as a new area for economic growth and technology development. Read the blog for more information.
  • A new ‘buy local’ search platform in collaboration with the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, to support its goals of supporting its small businesses. AWS has built the platform, called Common Goods, in partnership with MindGrub, and it is now onboarding local merchants. The site, which uses semantics to prioritize Pennsylvania-based businesses, will launch in the coming months.
  • AWS will help power The Room Intelligence Platform, a new initiative from The African Leadership Group—an ecosystem of organizations focused on harnessing the power of the booming African population—to connect global talent to in-demand technical careers. AWS will also offer cloud skills training curriculum to assist in the effort.
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